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"RT" from Pam's Facebook status - A Suburbs Boy Living a Country Life [Pete and Pam's pages (photos and some commentary)] [Pam's journal] [Our company] [My Flickr Photos] [Arisia]
November 9th, 2009
11:12 pm

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"RT" from Pam's Facebook status
Pam Ochs
Baby girl sayings: Words: Hello ("Hah-lahhhhhh"), All Done, Mama, Dadda, Uh-Oh ("Ah-Ahhhhhhhh") Signs: More, Cookie, Water, Banana, All Done Other Gestures: Give Kisses ("Muh!"), Blow kisses, Two-handed beckon, Pick-Me-Up Other Sounds: "Prrrrrrrrr" (kitty), "Urf, Urf" (doggies), "Shhhhhh" (with finger on lips, be quiet) "Ffffffff" (cooling food)


Dad's addenda: we're working on "Eat" [fingers to lips], she has some sort of word for her Brother but we haven't figured out how to reproduce it, she is close to picking up banana, and I think she made the sign for mother [palm open, fingers spread, thumb to chin twice] tonight.

N really seems to like signing and being understood--I had no idea how empowering ASL could be for hearing kids, but apparently it does a lot for them while also accelerating spoken language [because they've already started communicating with gestural language even before their vocal development catches up to form the spoken words].  So, we're learning sign language, a bit at time.

I'm terribly frustrated because everyone in my family can make the kitty "purrr" sound with their tongues...I can only blow raspberries, which just isn't the same.  [Yes, I cannot roll an "R!"  If anyone can teach me, great--Pam has tried to no avail].

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From:gonzy317
Date:November 10th, 2009 04:30 am (UTC)
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Signing is awesome - but don't be surprised when she totally stops while she starts working on some other skill. (babies obsess that way). Aaron had a HUGE vocab of both words/signs, and then completely stopped using them in August. He's just started using them again.

And no - if you can't roll your R's, you just can't. No amount of 'practice' will help. It's a genetic thing. :)
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From:happypete
Date:November 11th, 2009 12:52 pm (UTC)

she's so cute when she obsesses!

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we'll keep you posted..y'all come down and see us.
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From:c1
Date:November 10th, 2009 05:14 am (UTC)
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Yes, I cannot roll an "R!" If anyone can teach me, great--Pam has tried to no avail

First, hold the R with both hands, one on each side. Then, you simply push the top side of the R forward, holding back any forward action of the R's bottom (ideally, the bottom should stay put). If done correctly, you should have an R that's on its top, and with further, consistent action, should come back around to rest on its bottom. If visuals are required, consider the way a child performs a somersault, as viewed from the side.

NC, HTH, HAND.
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From:happypete
Date:November 10th, 2009 12:32 pm (UTC)

/me headdesks...

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Only you, c1...Only you. Can't wait to see you in January! Pam and I are still obsessing over:

1) Planes--ripping the band-aid and just getting there fast
2) Trains--slower, but children can run around a bit, go to the dining car on our schedule, etc.
3) Automobile--being hired as transportation by local dealer and driving.

Edited at 2009-11-11 12:52 pm (UTC)
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From:tonyvila
Date:November 10th, 2009 11:40 am (UTC)
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Also, don't be surprised if when she gets good at sign verbals get a bit delayed - if you're communicating effectively with hands, why work hard on talking? It happened with our older boy.

As for the Rs: speaking as a native Spanish speaker, it is something learned when you are young or you can't do it. Sorry.
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From:kitwench
Date:November 10th, 2009 01:02 pm (UTC)
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Sign is wonderful for babies, and they're SO much happier when they can communicate.
Just curious- are you using ASL or Baby Sign?
They're close, and most Baby Sign is based off ASL, but the finger movements are much more simplified to compensate for little bitty fingers.
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From:happypete
Date:November 10th, 2009 01:24 pm (UTC)

so far it looks like ASL...

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I think there are some SEE signs, as well...I don't know enough to know the difference.

She has a hard time with cookie--the sign we learned is like a big C with your hand rotated on the palm of the other--but she just pokes one finger on her palm and twists.

I'm terribly afraid that she's making an obscene ASL word!
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From:whuffle
Date:November 10th, 2009 02:48 pm (UTC)
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If you don't already have it, go buy a the Baby Signing Time DVD series. (There's 4 DVDs in the baby series plus another 13 geared for toddlers & preschoolers.) We've been using them since about 6 months of age and Hootie is all over them. His daycare teachers now ask him when they don't know what the sign is for something!
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From:happypete
Date:November 11th, 2009 01:05 pm (UTC)

Thanks for the suggestion...

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Yes, I really do think it's good for her all-around.
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From:happypete
Date:November 20th, 2009 04:33 pm (UTC)

DVDs

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From:whuffle
Date:November 20th, 2009 04:43 pm (UTC)

Re: DVDs

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That's voume 1. There are 4 in the baby sign series and 13 in the signing time for toddlers/preschoolers series. Go straight to signingtime.com and order direct instead.
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From:whuffle
Date:November 10th, 2009 02:51 pm (UTC)
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Oh, and by the way, there are extensive studies that show that learning sign language is a lot like being bilingual. Sure it means slower verbal development at the start, but once they get the hang of it, they become better at language in general than they'd have been if they'd just been learning one at a time. The end result is a kid who tends to be more verbal and have a better vocab they his or her peers before kindergarten. Usually kids who are bilingual are also starting to read earlier than their peers. Oh, and because sign is one of the languages in question, it has the added bonus of advanced hand/eye coordination which stimulates left/right brain connectivity making for better thinkers when they are older.
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