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Scrubs epiphany - A Suburbs Boy Living a Country Life [Pete and Pam's pages (photos and some commentary)] [Pam's journal] [Our company] [My Flickr Photos] [Arisia]
December 6th, 2007
08:55 am

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Scrubs epiphany

The character I love the most in Scrubs is not the uber-geeky, playful J.D., whom I probably most resemble.

It's Dr. Cox with his hate-the-world-particularly-you scathing rants, his expressed so-not-caring [while he obviously does], even his tendency to fall into bed with the wrong women, particularly his so-wrong-it's-right ex-wife.

In some ways I wish I could be a little bit more like him--but don't you dare tell him that, he'd rip me apart.

In the re-run I just watched, his last scene with J.D. is this touching moment, where he is [off-camera] standing behind J.D., as J.D. pores over his textbooks and web-sites trying to figure out what he did wrong for a patient that died [while a patient of Dr. Cox's, with ostensibly the same condition, recovered].  Dr. Cox lets him off the hook--tells him that he did everything right, and that he knew it because he had been monitoring his treatment the whole time.  J.D. takes this in and, with the weight of the world lifting from his shoulders says:  "Thanks."

Dr. Cox, as he turns and walks out, quips:  "It's not a favor, Janet.  It's my job."

Now that I think about it, a lot of my personal heroes in my Science Fiction soap-operas are not the protagonists--dashing, dweeby, or both--but the noncoms, officers, and mentors who help a succession of their sort grow up, while never caring too much because they know a bunch of them won't make it.

Current Mood: amusedamused

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From:macavite
Date:December 6th, 2007 07:46 pm (UTC)

favorite characters

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Those officers giving their best to the likely-doomed troops is a reoccurring theme in one of my faviorite little sub-genre's. WWI aviation stories/movies. Flight training was measured in days, average survival time for a new pilot was measured in hours. It's common in any war-story to not want to get to know 'the replacements', but particularly true for WWI avaition.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Goshawk_Squadron
From:manatee_x
Date:December 7th, 2007 12:03 am (UTC)

Heh, I love scrubs

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One of my favorite episodes was where BOTH Dr. Cox and Dr. Kelso are independently quoted as saying,

"People are bastard coated bastards with bastard filling"

Anyhow.....

-Chris
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