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October 15th, 2006
11:24 am

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Anyone have any idea...
...what the maximum clear span of a W12x14 steel beam is, for standard residential loadings IRC2000 [I think it's 45 PSF & 10 PSF dead load].  The "tributary area," on either side, as best I can figure, is 12'.  [It's a 36' barn, and there are two girders across--I want to make the one above the open area steel, to (a) use one of those leftover steel beams from the house and (b) avoid a column in the open area, or move it as far over as possible, to give maximum equipment-driving-in, etc., space...

I found various programs that seemed like they might give me the answer if I set up the problem correctly, but couldn't puzzle my way through it.

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From:mattblum
Date:October 15th, 2006 08:50 pm (UTC)
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I don't have time to run through the math right now, but I think you could use the equations from this Google Answer, and solve for l, plugging in the moment of inertia (I) value of 88.6, which is what this page gives for a W12x14 beam.
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From:mattblum
Date:October 15th, 2006 08:52 pm (UTC)
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Sorry - just realized that the two variables I used look identical in Arial. The first is a lowercase L, and the second an uppercase I (the letter after H, that is).
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From:c1
Date:October 16th, 2006 01:34 am (UTC)
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Your steel supplier will have all this information. It's pretty standardized, and at least for aluminum, charts exist for that kind of thing -length of span v. loading, etc.
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